Tag: fall

fall

When it gets crisp in the fall…

Leaves trade their greens for gold, orange, and red. The chill in the air lures sweaters from closets and cabinets. The moon steals a few minutes of daylight from the sun each day. It’s autumn, my favorite season.I love autumn for its colors, flavors (there’s more to the season than pumpkin spice, y’all), fashion, weather—and spookiness. October marks the beginning of the spooky season, which lasts through January. Winter is spooky. (Telling ghost stories at Christmas is a tradition I want to see resurrected.) Ghoulies and goblins and ghosties, oh my! They feel out of place in the spring and summer. The autumnal equinox marks their return home. My viewing and reading habits shift in the fall. During the bright, sunny, warm times of the year, I seek out light, fun, breezy entertainment. My habits adopt a darker bent come fall. Bring on the horror movies, the ghost stories, the tales of the malevolent and macabre. What about you? Does your taste in books, movies, and TV change with the weather? What entertains you during these dark, chilly days?Comment here or hop over to the Facebook page to join the discussion

Read More

Winter Storm

 Winter’s got me in a slump. Short days, long nights. Subzero temperatures. Ice storms that shut down cities. Layers and layers, so many layers, of clothing. Enough, already. Bring on Spring.
Writing’s tough for me when I’ve got the winter doldrums. My brain wants to hibernate from November through mid-March, not devise intricate plots and perilous situations for my characters to overcome. Winter is my antagonist.
Which makes me think—can the season or the weather act as a character in a story? I answer my own question—sure. Person versus nature is as classic a battle as person versus person or person versus self. In Murder on the Orient Express, winter weather stops the train. Snow is as much the bad guy as the killer. Snow makes another appearance as an opposing force in J. Jefferson Farjeon’s Mystery in White. The title of Julia Spencer-Fleming’s In the Bleak Midwinter leaves no doubt the season plays a role in the plot. Peter Hoeg’s Smila’s Sense of Snow hinges on the protagonist’s knowledge of the frigid stuff.
Writing this, I notice novels featuring winter-as-opposing-force come to mind more readily than novels where spring, summer, or fall weather drive the plot. Probably because, to me, weather is the most malevolent of all seasons. But I can imagine situations where a spring thunderstorm or summer drought might figure as integral parts of a story. Fall’s harder. A body in a leaf pile, maybe? What are some other stories where the weather is the star?  Comment here or start a discussion on Facebook.
 

Read More

Search By Tags